Memoirs of General der Artillerie Max Karl Wilhelm von Gallwitz

*****************************************************

Memoirs of General der Artillerie Max Karl Wilhelm von Gallwitz c 1930

When the Kaiser ascended the throne, our artillery was still something that a gunner of Napoleon’s time would have recognized. Our guns were better, of course. Made of steel, breech-loading, and the recently invented smokeless propellants would have all been novel. But the tactics and techniques would have been largely the same. The field artillery was focused on mobility over all else. Horse drawn batteries trained to gallop across a field, setup, fire a few rounds, then gallop to another point on the field and fire a few more. If anything, our capability had regressed since the great victories of 1870. The lessons of Sedan had been forgotten, time having distorted memories, and Theophil von Podbielski had wreaked havoc with his cavalryman minded changes during his tenure as Inspector General of artillery from 1872 to 1886.

This content is restricted to site members. If you are an existing user, please log in. New users may register below.

Existing Users Log In
   
New User Registration
*Required field

Comments are closed.